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Borich Wins GEICO Mountain Ridge GNCC in Last Lap Battle, Takes Points Lead Back


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Borich Outlasts Chris Bithell’s Charge, Bill Ballance Finishes Third

2007%20GNCC%20Logo%20Final%202.jpgGNCC logoSomerset, PA – East Coast ATV’s Chris Borich and Yamaha’s Bill Ballance may try to keep the pressure off during their closest title fight ever, but they can’t hide much longer. Borich nailed a big overall win at the GEICO Mountain Ridge round of the Can-Am Grand National Cross Country Series, and his emotions on the podium made it clear that this title means the world to him.

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