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ROHVA Announces Safety Rules for Safe and Responsible Use of UTVs

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ROHVA Announces Safety Rules for Safe and Responsible Use of Recreational Off-Highway Vehicles

Receives ANSI Accreditation to Develop Voluntary Vehicle Standard for this Emerging New Product Category

IRVINE, Calif., Nov 10, 2008 -- Formed by the major manufacturers and distributors to promote the safe and responsible use of a new and emerging category of recreational off-highway vehicles (ROVs), the Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Association (ROHVA) received ANSI accreditation on November 3, 2008 to develop a standard for the equipment, configuration and performance requirements of ROVs. In addition, ROHVA has published Safety Rules for these increasingly popular off-road vehicles.

An ROV -- sometimes broadly referred to as a side-by-side or UTV -- is a motorized off-highway vehicle designed to travel on four or more non-highway tires, with a steering wheel, non-straddle seating, seat belts, an occupant protective structure, and engine displacement up to 1,000cc. Current models are designed with seats for a driver and one or more passengers. ROVs' performance and durability make them ideally suited for a variety of outdoor recreational activities as well as many work applications.

The following "ROV Safety Rules" focus on safe and responsible ROV use:

1. Always wear protective gear, use the seat belts, keep all parts of your body inside the ROV, and wear a helmet when driving the ROV for recreational purposes.

2. Never drive on public roads -- another vehicle could hit you.

3. Drive only in designated areas, at a safe speed, and use care when turning and crossing slopes.

4. Never drive under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.

5. Never drive an ROV unless you're 16 or older or have a driver's license. ROVs are not toys.

6. Never carry more passengers than the ROV is designed for, and never allow a passenger who is too small to sit in a passenger seat to ride in the ROV.

7. Read and follow the operator's manual and warning labels.

"The safety of the driver and passengers of ROVs is the top priority of the ROHVA member companies," said ROHVA Vice President Tom Yager. "ROHVA and our member companies strongly recommend that ROV drivers and passengers follow these important safety rules to avoid crashes and injuries."

ROHVA submitted its application for accreditation by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) on June 13, 2008 and received accreditation to develop a standard for ROVs on November 3. ROHVA will manage the standards development process and make certain that the final standard is in full compliance with ANSI guidelines. An approved ANSI standard for equipment configuration and performance requirements in this emerging product category will benefit consumers.

In addition, ROHVA will serve as the primary resource for information on ROVs. To coincide with its ANSI accreditation the association has launched a website, www.rohva.org, and has published ROV Safety Rules as well as a description of this emerging vehicle category. Further specific ROV educational materials are currently under development and will be posted to the site.

ROVs offered in dealerships across the country include the Arctic Cat Prowler, Kawasaki TERYX™, Polaris Ranger® and Ranger RZR™, and Yamaha Rhino models.

The Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Association (ROHVA) was formed to promote the safe and responsible use of recreational off-highway vehicles (ROVs) manufactured or distributed in North America. Based in Irvine, Calif., the not-for-profit trade association is sponsored by Arctic Cat, Honda, Kawasaki, Polaris, and Yamaha.

SOURCE: Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Association

Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Association

Media Relations

(949) 255-2560, Ext. 3132

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