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Fussard

Fussard

2 posts in this topic

Fuel pump getting low voltage. Changed out relay still the same.

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Less than three volts to the starter when cranking would lead me to suspect a bad ground on the negative battery cable as a starting point. If that is good, then it is likely the relay or the igniter. Lift the seat out and follow the wiring harness, you will find the relay. Take a look at the parts diagrams on Kawasaki.com to get an idea of what you are looking for.

These use a power lead from the igniter to the coil to power the pump relay. It is a safety thing so the pump shuts off when the ignition is killed. If the igniter does not generate enough power the relay will not trip, or if the pump shorts it burns out the relay too.

If the pump will not freely pump when directly connected to 12 volts DC, then it is likely defective. A generic pulse type pump from an auto parts store works great and usually costs less than ten bucks. But, if you do that you need to wire in a new fuel pump switch and get the load off the coil lug. Most farmers toss the OEM ignition switch and replace it with a heavy duty type with a hot lug when the key is on to power the fuel pump and eliminate the cut solenoid. But, that is something that may present a safety hazard if you do not know what you are doing and properly fuse everything.

If you download a manual get it from a trusted source that is published as in the business. There are some that post on Ebay that are good. Frankly, I prefer the aftermarket manuals as they are more complete and do not require the owner to purchase two manuals to get everything that is required. Also, the Kawasaki manual assumes the user has had Kawasaki training so cuts to "remove the part," without always telling you how to remove the part.

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