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Kawasaki Mule 3010 battery


Thomas Mohr

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You can put as large of a battery as you want. Within reason. The size of the battery has virtually no effect in the charging system. The drain on the charging system (How many amps you are using) is what is damaging to the charging system. Think of your charging system as a bank. The battery is the checking account, the alternator output determines how quickly and how large of a deposit you make, and the electrical load being the checks. When you use more electricity than the alternator can produce, you start using the reserve funds. When you run out of reserve funds and are still using more electricity than the alternator can produce, checks BOUNCE! (meaning damage to the alternator,and or regulator is assured). As long as the electrical system isn't overtaxed, you're fine.😁

It's mostly about minimum cranking requirements and fit. If you can fit a bigger, or more importantly, higher cold cranking amp, battery, I definitely would.  

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Welcome to the forum Thomas! The diesel mule uses a higher output alternator than the gas model, so it's possible that the battery has more cca also. Might be an option for your situation. When my battery went out a few years back, I opted for an oem replacement, since I got about eight or ten years out of the old one. Over the years I've learned that weight is a better indication of quality batteries, since it's the number of lead plates inside that matters. That oem battery is very heavy for its size. Even by battery standards that thing was heavy. It's hard to find a good battery at a really good price these days. So in the end it was just as cheap to get the original replacement. 

If you need to up the amperage output of the alternator, then any good alternator repair place should be able to do that. I don't replace oem starters, or alternators any more, I have them all repaired. The replacement equipment that's sold at auto supply places are always cheap junk. Unless you buy from the dealer for several hundred dollars, you're better off helping the local guy out, while you save some money. Good luck with your choice!

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