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kenfain

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kenfain last won the day on May 8

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About kenfain

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    Kawasaki mule diesel

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  1. Depending on the location of the solenoid, there's no real need to mount the button on the dash. You could easily mount it somewhere around the seat, within easy reach, with shorter wires. Momentarily handling that modest amount of amps shouldn't be any reason to up the guage significantly. I would think that 18g. would work fine.
  2. Sounds like a good, solid plan. My guess is that if this solves the no start condition, there's no real need for a new harness. So I'd stay mindful of creating something that'll stand up over time.
  3. It's certainly possible if you have enough straight section of bar to remove. You planning on doing it yourself?
  4. You should be able to use just about anything. I have an older 3010 mule, and I used big channel locks on mine. A couple of C-clamps would probably work too. So if you have a real strut compressor, you'll be okay. These springs aren't as dangerous as car springs.
  5. There's lots of videos online that show how to disassemble, and replace most types of automotive electrical plugs.
  6. Maybe you'll get lucky with the new ignition switch.
  7. Sometimes it's displayed as a number on the clock. It might not blink, but just display the number. I don't know how many sensors there are on yours. But with what's going on with yours, there should certainly be a code. Have you looked at switching the upstream, and downstream exhaust sensors?
  8. If you can establish that it's working properly, while the mule still doesn't start. You can move on to the next test. But a bad solenoid does sometimes cause these exact symptoms. And the solenoid did get hot. I'm pretty sure it isn't supposed to do that. Considering how the solenoid works internally handling a good amount of current to the starter. There's only a couple ways that it could make heat. High current draw, or some kind of short internally. I'm certain that it's not current draw, since the starter wasn't turning at that point. So it seems some kind of short is all th
  9. You should carry your multimeter on the mule. Next time it does it, test that solenoid again. While it's doing it. I still think there's a pretty good chance it's a bad solenoid. That thing getting hot seems suspicious, since everything else is pretty much new.
  10. Have you checked the digital clock on the dash for codes? A lot of the models made in the last decade or so, blink the clock, and you count the blinks, to get the code. Others will display a digital number, that represents a code on the clock instead.
  11. Any luck on finding a way to check for trouble codes?
  12. I'd have to say that the starter amp draw seems normal enough. Sounds like it's not getting enough amps, when it doesn't start though. The solenoid has been changed, so there's really not much left. After you replace those cables, if the problem persists. You might want to take a look at that switch, and any relays that might be there.
  13. They don't. Sorry, but as I said, I have no idea exactly how much it should be. But on my Honda civic, it seems like it wasn't a lot. I don't think a healthy mule starter would pull 60 amps though. That was my point about it might be too low for 60a. tester. But the 3amp, is more about it being useful for automotive needs. And there's not really any trade off on the higher end, for use around the house. So there's no reason not to. As long as it's one of these same knockoff Chinese junk. It'll be affordable. That capability in a major brand would be plenty expensive.
  14. You really need one that measures as little as 3 amp IIRC. Looks like the one you linked starts at 60amp. There's no way your starter pulls anywhere near enough amps to give a reading.
  15. Since you're replacing the cables, and you have a known good solenoid. That's a good starting point for finding your problem. You should be seeing that new multimeter soon. New parts, and a few quick tests, should start getting some answers. Unfortunately I have no idea what is considered normal amp draw for yours, (or mine either). You should be able to get that same information from the internet, or maybe the manufacturer, hopefully on their website.

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