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Valve Ajustment


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Lenny, Could you look over this and tell me if this is right Thanks

Thank you for purchasing our stage 1 cam upgrade kit for the 1100 trooper/sandviper

The following is a detailed explanation for the cam installation on a trooper 1100cc.

1. First of all to check that your engine is in good condition, a compression check is recommended.

2. Start off by disconnecting your battery

3. Remove breather hoses attached to the valve cover

4. Remove Philips screws and sparkplug wires

5. Remove 10mm bolts on valve cover and remove valve cover

6. Remove spark plugs

7. Measure and write down valve lash on the bottom of the lobe of each valve (16 total measurements)

8. Turn crank pulley until you are at TDC on no 1 (piston all the way up marking on the crank pulley lines up the with marking on the plastic timing belt cover, and cam markings also line up in the middle.

9. At this point you can remove the water pump belt followed by the water pump pulley

10. Remove dip stick from motor plug hole so debris doesn’t find its way in there

11. Remove the upper timing belt cover (10mm bolts)

12. Remove timing belt cam pulley

13. At this point you can remove your old camshafts by removing the 10mm bolts that hold them in place.

14. After the cams are removed it is a good idea to re-torque your head bolts (53ft Lbs)

15. At this point you can install your new cams making sure the three dots line up on the gears

16. Now use the modified cam gear make sure to use the side with the angle machined into it.

17. Now turn the motor and take your valve lash measurements one more time, this will be a higher number than the previous due to the cam’s new profile.

18. Now take the new measurement for example .032 and subtract the recommended specs which are .007 +/- .002 on the intake and .009 +/- .002 on the exhaust which would leave you needing a .025 shim for the intake or a .023 shim for the exhaust.

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Lenny, Could you look over this and tell me if this is right Thanks

Thank you for purchasing our stage 1 cam upgrade kit for the 1100 trooper/sandviper

The following is a detailed explanation for the cam installation on a trooper 1100cc.

1. First of all to check that your engine is in good condition, a compression check is recommended.

2. Start off by disconnecting your battery

3. Remove breather hoses attached to the valve cover

4. Remove Philips screws and sparkplug wires

5. Remove 10mm bolts on valve cover and remove valve cover

6. Remove spark plugs

7. Measure and write down valve lash on the bottom of the lobe of each valve (16 total measurements)

8. Turn crank pulley until you are at TDC on no 1 (piston all the way up marking on the crank pulley lines up the with marking on the plastic timing belt cover, and cam markings also line up in the middle.

9. At this point you can remove the water pump belt followed by the water pump pulley

10. Remove dip stick from motor plug hole so debris doesn’t find its way in there

11. Remove the upper timing belt cover (10mm bolts)

12. Remove timing belt cam pulley

13. At this point you can remove your old camshafts by removing the 10mm bolts that hold them in place.

14. After the cams are removed it is a good idea to re-torque your head bolts (53ft Lbs)

15. At this point you can install your new cams making sure the three dots line up on the gears

16. Now use the modified cam gear make sure to use the side with the angle machined into it.

17. Now turn the motor and take your valve lash measurements one more time, this will be a higher number than the previous due to the cam’s new profile.

18. Now take the new measurement for example .032 and subtract the recommended specs which are .007 +/- .002 on the intake and .009 +/- .002 on the exhaust which would leave you needing a .025 shim for the intake or a .023 shim for the exhaust.

The other piece of information which is badly needed is "where to get the shims" to the best of my knowledge, we still have not found a good source for shims.

Kinarfi

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Lenny, Could you look over this and tell me if this is right Thanks

Thank you for purchasing our stage 1 cam upgrade kit for the 1100 trooper/sandviper

The following is a detailed explanation for the cam installation on a trooper 1100cc.

1. First of all to check that your engine is in good condition, a compression check is recommended.

2. Start off by disconnecting your battery

3. Remove breather hoses attached to the valve cover

4. Remove Philips screws and sparkplug wires

5. Remove 10mm bolts on valve cover and remove valve cover

6. Remove spark plugs

7. Measure and write down valve lash on the bottom of the lobe of each valve (16 total measurements)

8. Turn crank pulley until you are at TDC on no 1 (piston all the way up marking on the crank pulley lines up the with marking on the plastic timing belt cover, and cam markings also line up in the middle.

EITHER THE FRONT MOST CYLINDER OR THE REAR MOST CYLINDER WORKS BUT THE REAR MOST IS #1

9. At this point you can remove the water pump belt followed by the water pump pulley

10. Remove dip stick from motor plug hole so debris doesnt find its way in there

11. Remove the upper timing belt cover (10mm bolts)

12. Remove timing belt cam pulley

13. At this point you can remove your old camshafts by removing the 10mm bolts that hold them in place.

14. After the cams are removed it is a good idea to re-torque your head bolts (53ft Lbs)

15. At this point you can install your new cams making sure the three dots line up on the gears

16. Now use the modified cam gear make sure to use the side with the angle machined into it.

17. Now turn the motor and take your valve lash measurements one more time, this will be a higher number than the previous due to the cams new profile.

18. Now take the new measurement for example .032 and subtract the recommended specs which are .007 +/- .002 on the intake and .009 +/- .002 on the exhaust which would leave you needing a .025 shim for the intake or a .023 shim for the exhaust.

THE THIN SHIM GOES UNDER THE STOCK THICKER SHIM

Everything looks fine. The instructions are correct. See notes.

Lenny

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So to the best of you knowledge, If I check my valve clearances again and need new shim pucks, he's the man to call? Any idea what the cost is per shim? Probably ought to just ask Rick or Jose.

Not exactly, Silver bullet provides adder shims that go under the stock shim to make up for the extra clearance created by the new ground torque cams. If you have to go thicker, then he can probably provide adder shims that go under the stock shims to close up the surplus clearance but if you need to go thinner then he can't help. At least if you can find, stock like, 25mm shims that are thinner but maybe too thin, then you could maybe get Silverbullets adder shims to get back to correct.

Lenny

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  • 1 month later...

Plumber,

How is this going? Got'em in yet?

The mechanic that put them in screw up everything I have took the head off and sent it to silverbullit. Now that I have took the head off and took the cams out I wish that I just done it myself the first time. It's not that bad to take the cams out just like rick said just take your time.I'm hoping to have them in by the end of this month so I can go on the East Coast Ride.I have only but 25 miles on the trooper this year I'm dying to go riding some were

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  • 2 months later...

Someone has probably already told you this, but if you use two shims on one bucket you take a very real chance of spitting the shims out, causing a real mess. I found this out the hard way, on our race bike (kawa). We didn't have the right shim handy so we doubled up, spit the shims out through the front of the head. It not only broke the head it destroyed the cam too. Yamaha 25mm shims work and the come in an abundance of sizes. The Yahama dealer where I'am from will exchange shims, mabye the dealer near you will do the same. I was told the reason for this is oil gets between the shims causing a hydralic effect BOOM!!!

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I think you brought up an interesting point. I haven't thought of that possibility. I have however run the double shims for some time now with out trouble. I think that part of the difference is that the extra shims Silverbullet is putting under the main shim are quite thin, .005 to .030" I beleive and they also have a center hole in them. The top shim would have to raise .050-.060" more to get out of the bucket. Having an oil film build up in between the shims to that amount don't seem possible. After all there is quite a bit of pressure holding things together and were not reving the engine high enough to get valve float. I'm confident that I will be fine but after what you brought up, I may reconsider if I were doing it on a high reving engine. Hum, does that then qualify us for having hydraulic lifters?

Lenny

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I didn't know that they were so thin and that they had a hole in the center that might eliminate the hydralic effect, as far as hydralic lifters go I personaly think the direct contac we have now is better. There would be less heat build up and less chance to break something. The setup they have in F-1 engines is the best yet, it is a hydralic valve return enabling them to make unreal H.P. and rev to 20,000 and higher.

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