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Darryl223
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I don't have a utv yet, and I'm just looking for info at the moment.  I've been looking at can am commanders, but I've also just recently discovered the Joyner renegade and I really like the design.  I'm looking for something to use on our farm, just light stuff.  Also to go up in the hills here (mountains of central Washington). My concern with the Joyner is reliability and parts availability.  What are your guys recent experiences?  Do the newest machines have improved quality over the earlier models?  Is parts availability still an issue for you?  Are your machines leaving you stranded?  I don't want to put my wife on something that's going to break down all the time.  

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1 hour ago, Darryl223 said:

I don't have a utv yet, and I'm just looking for info at the moment.  I've been looking at can am commanders, but I've also just recently discovered the Joyner renegade and I really like the design.  I'm looking for something to use on our farm, just light stuff.  Also to go up in the hills here (mountains of central Washington). My concern with the Joyner is reliability and parts availability.  What are your guys recent experiences?  Do the newest machines have improved quality over the earlier models?  Is parts availability still an issue for you?  Are your machines leaving you stranded?  I don't want to put my wife on something that's going to break down all the time.  

Silverbullet

If you can afford the can am than it is a better built buggy. Thai have improved the whole buggy but the Can Am is one of the best utvs built.

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It all depends on your price point. I have had great luck with my 2008 trooper.  It has never left me stranded. Newer models aresupposed to be more reliable. The biggest drawback is you can't just go drop it off at the dealer for repairs. You need to be handy and do the upkeep and maintenance. Parts are avaliable,  but quality can be an issue.  I usually try to upgrade parts such as tierods, cv boots, air filter, etc when possible.  That way you can often just go to a local automotive parts store to get what you need.  I can afford a higher end machine,  but the trooper does everything I need it to so it's hard to justify. Plus, I trust it more for reliability than my wifes wildcat.  But that it because I upgraded critical areas which needed to be addressed on older models. 

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I can afford the can am, I like the steel body and manual transmission of the Joyner.  It's a pretty cool concept.  Seems like I'm always drawn to the oddball stuff.  Thanks for the quick feedback.  Oh and I'm a diesel mechanic and millwright, repairing things is all I do.

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My buddy has a Can Am and if I could my choice of a new Can AM or new Trooper, I'd take the Trooper, as his passenger, I get hot because of where the engine is, the Can Am has good fit and finish, but I don't like the CVT, it does have a good compression system for going down hill but it might be to good because you have to give it gas to down hill, I like my trooper and it's 5 speed and I really like the tires I special ordered + all my wheels are the same size instead of the wider wheels on the rear.

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On 1/31/2017 at 4:20 PM, 2scoops said:

It all depends on your price point. I have had great luck with my 2008 trooper.  It has never left me stranded. Newer models aresupposed to be more reliable. The biggest drawback is you can't just go drop it off at the dealer for repairs. You need to be handy and do the upkeep and maintenance. Parts are avaliable,  but quality can be an issue.  I usually try to upgrade parts such as tierods, cv boots, air filter, etc when possible.  That way you can often just go to a local automotive parts store to get what you need.  I can afford a higher end machine,  but the trooper does everything I need it to so it's hard to justify. Plus, I trust it more for reliability than my wifes wildcat.  But that it because I upgraded critical areas which needed to be addressed on older models. 

So some of these issues have been resolved on newer units?

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  • 2 weeks later...

2016 model ordered today, 2000$ factory rebate.  They offer to install a turbo kit that won't void the warranty, waiting to hear back on what their kit consists of before I decide on that.  He said differentials have stronger bolts now, ball joints are American made etc.  Six weeks out, can't wait

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Like 2scoops and kinarfi said the issues with past models has been addressed. If your use it for farm use and climbing around your farm you can't go wrong with a trooper or any other model of joyner. You need the manual trans not the CVT it will most certainly fail if you start to pull a trailer or anything else. I have a 2008 T2, I don't own a car or truck. I use mine for everything from the street to any off road condition and have pilled up 50,000+ miles on mine. The only thing I ever broke  that was a problem with the t2 from factory was the front diff. the rear I updated when I bought it because I knew about it before hand. Parts has never been a problem before, you can get them from the joyner outlets around the country or at your local auto parts store. The other makers make great buggies for going fast but not for work. I just wanted to put in my 2 cents worth have fun with whatever you decide on. Oh! one more thing I have 2 T2's the other has a turbo and I myself am disappointed with how it runs it takes to long for the power to come in. Yeh I know you can make other additions to it to make it better but I will go with a blower (super charger) next time. The power is always there from idle, all the way up.

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1 hour ago, lowgear said:

Like 2scoops and kinarfi said the issues with past models has been addressed. If your use it for farm use and climbing around your farm you can't go wrong with a trooper or any other model of joyner. You need the manual trans not the CVT it will most certainly fail if you start to pull a trailer or anything else. I have a 2008 T2, I don't own a car or truck. I use mine for everything from the street to any off road condition and have pilled up 50,000+ miles on mine. The only thing I ever broke  that was a problem with the t2 from factory was the front diff. the rear I updated when I bought it because I knew about it before hand. Parts has never been a problem before, you can get them from the joyner outlets around the country or at your local auto parts store. The other makers make great buggies for going fast but not for work. I just wanted to put in my 2 cents worth have fun with whatever you decide on. Oh! one more thing I have 2 T2's the other has a turbo and I myself am disappointed with how it runs it takes to long for the power to come in. Yeh I know you can make other additions to it to make it better but I will go with a blower (super charger) next time. The power is always there from idle, all the way up.

I put in an order for a 2016, still mulling over whether to get the factory turbo.  Advantage being it doesn't void the warranty, and it's a good value considering they install it.  The super charger would be better in some instances, but it seems it's been in development for a long time, no release date and no potential cost.  I'd also be waiting until my warranty ended to do it. I'm probably going to get it since I'm so close to sand dunes, maybe in the future switch if I don't like it.  Nice to hear you have an 08 with that much use on it, I am a mechanic but I still do appreciate reliability. 

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  • 1 month later...

Probably be a week or two before I really get it out.  I'm in central Washington, up in the mountains.  Im only a five minute drive from many miles of forest service roads.  I've got sand dunes about an hour drive from here as well, this thing is going to see a lot of use.

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  • 1 month later...

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