Lenny

Trooper Easy to use Shock adjusters

Recommended Posts

When I'm out at the trails, I like to be able to adjust my shock preload based on what I'm going to do. If My wife rides, I want it soft as she has a back that bothers her. Then, when I hit the trails with the guys, I want to firm it up. This was too much of a hassel with the stock adjusters so I didn't change it. To correct the problem, I removed the stock adjusters and made new ones. I used radial roller thrust bearings with an O-ring seal. I now can change the preload without releiving the spring pressure and I can do it without tools. I do have a viair air compressor on my trooper with a 3 gal. tank that I can load to 200psi. With this high npressure, I can blow the shock threads clean before doing any adjusting. The 200psi and 3 gal tank also allow me a better chance to seat a stubbern bead seat. My jack has an attachment which will break a tires bead for internal tire repairs.

I've included a pic of my shock adjuster mod.

Lenny

post-194-1229390917_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Nice piece, i like the o-ring to keep the grit out, could the bearing be recess into the nut.

Thank you. The bearing is recessed into the lower sleeve. When assembled the space between the two peices is .010". "The O-ring closes up the .010" gap. If your refering to recessing the bearing into the threaded part, yes I could but to help keep turning forces spread, I wanted a good long adjusting nut. This helps the lubercant to keep the two threads apart otherwise the heavy forces may press through the lubercant. I even use a synthetic oil for better film strength. The big problem with the stock adjusters is that they are too short and suseptable to gulling which they do pretty easily.

Lenny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How much do you think you would charge for a set of 4 of those adjusters?

Jeff

Another idea would be to drill and thread a hole in the side, drop in a piece of plastic followed by a set screw or winged bolt to lock the adjuster in place, unless you think it will stay put.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How much do you think you would charge for a set of 4 of those adjusters?

Jeff

Another idea would be to drill and thread a hole in the side, drop in a piece of plastic followed by a set screw or winged bolt to lock the adjuster in place, unless you think it will stay put.

I'll take a look and see what I can get the aluminum and bearings for. If I'm making them for other people, maybe my bearing supplier will give me a break. Also, if I can get the aluminum cut to needed lengths, this will save machine time and material. My supplier uses a circular carbide saw to make the cuts and thus they are cut quite square and require just a little cleanup on the lathe. If I cut them, I would use either my horizontal or vertical bandsaw . Unless the blade is almost in perfect condition and adjusted perfectly square, going thru a 4" dia. round could get off easily as much as 1/8". This would be on both ends so you can see the material and machining difference. I have always had full control of all parts of a project but in this case, I'm machining threads for something that is elsewhere and thus I can't be totally confident of proper thread match. It would go on but it could be a little too tight or too loose. As a result I would prefer I had your shocks here. then when I machine the threads, I begin test fitting the two peices together when I'm nearing the proper thread depth.

I don't feel the adjusters will move on you. Mine haven't shown any inclination to move even the slightest bit.They still turn stiff because of the spring pressure. Not so much at the beginning of spring compression but when it starts loading it's a firm grip turning them. The ones you see in the picture is the rear shock. I'm restricted on length of the turning handles but I still do it by hand myself without an extension bar but I plan on putting 4 turning handles on them next time. That way my wife can adjust them by using a short 7" long pipe extension and moving from one handle to the next. At 7" out, it requires about 30 pounds pressure to turn the adjusters Thats pulling on one adjuster at a time. The front shocks not only have a lighter spring but room for much longer handles.

Forgive me for getting wordy but I like to lay everything out for people plus I'm sorta a wordy guy anyway. Let me do some checking and I'll get back to you with a quote. It is maching job and it takes a while so it's not real cheap but maybe it won't be so bad either. If I could make 3 or 4 sets at a time saving multiple setups, I could cut my machine time down.

Lenny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Very nice. How about a set of wheel adapts, big pattern VW to our pattern? I would like two so I can run paddles in the rear with VW rims.

rocmoc n Mexico/AZ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Very nice. How about a set of wheel adapts, big pattern VW to our pattern? I would like two so I can run paddles in the rear with VW rims.

rocmoc n Mexico/AZ

Thanks, I'll take a look at it. There are 3 diff blot patterns they use. I assume you want the 4x100? Also do you want to add width or keep them as thin as possible for structural requirments? Let me know and give me a little time and I'll get back to you.

Lenny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks, I'll take a look at it. There are 3 diff blot patterns they use. I assume you want the 4x100? Also do you want to add width or keep them as thin as possible for structural requirments? Let me know and give me a little time and I'll get back to you.

Lenny

Rocmoc has a trooper and troopers run a 4/115 bolt pattern on their wheels

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kinarfi is correct. Width is not my concern, strength & safety is.

rocmoc n Mexico/AZ

I know that the trooper is 4x115. I'm asking about the bolt pattern on the VW wheel, I beleive what you want for that is 4x100.

Is this correct?

Lenny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now