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My side by side always " struggles " when reaching 40 kph. Almost like there's a govender. I cleaned the carb and removed the filter. Always there. The machine was lit up for a couple of months. I still operate it, just at lower speeds. Any help would be greatly appreciated on the issue. Thanks for your time.

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what size.. 40 mph is mines top speed ... sorry did not catch the KPH  ...someone else had that issue.. was the ECM 

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      I see alot of questions about carb problems hopefully this will give some insight to there problems
      This list should go for almost all ATV/motorcycle carbs. CV or mechanical. I tried to list them by frequency

      1) Old fuel - this is the number one cause of carburetor problems. as it sits it dries out and varnishes the small ports/orifices in the bowl. All these problems can be cleaned with carb cleaner, air compressor , fine bristle brush, and a thin brass wire.

      2) Clogged idle jet - the orafice is small in this jet and it is the first to get clogged with tiny varnish particles and/or dirt.
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      3) Clogged main jet - This will only happen with extreme dirt and varnish. more then likely your idle jet will be clogged also.
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      4) Fuel over flowing from the bowl - this is caused by a bad float needle or varnish/dirt preventing the float needle from seating, or the float is out of adjustment.
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      5) fuel flow problems - Fuel not properly flowing into the carb, caused by clogged fuel filter, clogged petcock filter, kinked hose, clogged float needle/seat, clogged breather cap (although this one will run longer before dieing)
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      6) Choke clogged out out of adjustment - varnish is clogging the choke orafice in the bowl, or the choke cable is not opening the choke valve properly.
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      Hmmm its easier to show someone then try to explain in text but let's see if I can get it close. This is the best way I found.

      -Start with the adjuster screwed in almost the whole way before you assemble the brass slide valve back in the carb. The carb should be installed already before you start unless you cannot access the choke when the carb is installed

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      - keep working the adjuster until you feel about 1/8" of slack then tighten the adjuster lock nut.


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