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Travis

Boring or Honing? What's the difference

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Well, I'm kicking myself sideways,backways and upways right now. I found out in the manual that your supposed to hone  the cylinder before re ringing the piston. So I gotta do that.

 But what's the difference between boring the cylinder and honing it? Some people say boring it makes the cylinder bigger etc.  And some say honing does that.

 But i think honing it is just to remove minor scratches, right?

 And if i hone the cylinder, will that require oversize rings and piston?

 Thanks, T.

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Boring is rough cutting the cylinder to a larger size.  Honing is removing the rough cuts to make the cylinder walls almost perfectly smooth.  A few scratches (not gouges) are left to allow a place for oil to reside to lubricate the piston rings.

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What kind of hone do you recommend? I've seen some that are expandable and use stones. and some that look like cotton balls on the end :)

https://www.amazon.com/Performance-Tool-W80560-Piston-Cylinder/dp/B000N35LJE

or you have some like this

https://www.amazon.com/Research-FLEX-HONE-Cylinder-Abrasive-Diameter/dp/B002XUL1GW/ref=pd_lpo_vtph_263_tr_t_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=FTHTMYN6VMC0MGFZ52JE

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I would concur with all that's been mentioned above, but to also add, honing is also used to get rid of metal transfer residue. This happens with aluminum pistons. Usually it's a big problem for chainsaws, and such. Never heard of it being a problem on bigger engines.

    So honing in your case is probably optional. It's definitely recommended, but I wouldn't think there'd be much difference. If the motor is still out of the chassis, I'd take it apart, because I know myself too well. My OCD wouldn't let me just forget about it.

  As far as which hone to get, the one with the stones give a nice cross hatch pattern, which is what most people want. I didn't look at any of the others that you linked. But most of the rest will polish the cylinder. Polishing a cylinder is useful for 2 cycle engines, but certainly won't hurt yours. After all, that's what the rings are going to start doing immediately after starting it up. My recommendation would be to get the machine shop up the street to do that as well. Since a cylinder hone is not something you'll ever use much, why buy one? Honing used to be dirt cheap, probably still is. This will also allow you to ask these guys any questions that you might still have. Disassembling, and assembly will go much quicker,and be much easier this time around. It'll also give you a chance to check your previous work.

I'd say to just wade on in. Think of it this way; if you don't, and you can't seem to get it running right. You'll start second guessing all the stuff that you missed, or skipped. Since a motor doesn't have any extra parts, or needless rebuild procedures. Even something as simple as skipping the honing, will become suspect. I can almost guarantee that it won't be the problem, but this way it'll be eliminated for certain.

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Thanks! A guy that goes to our church  used  to work in a machine shop, and he's got a hone with the stones, so he's going to come over in a few days and do it, and help me put every thing back in together and button it up (hopefully) :) 

7 hours ago, kenfain said:

Since a motor doesn't have any extra parts

What do you mean? :D ;)   

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Oh, and guess where i found  the part where is says to hone the cylinder? there was a  * by the title of " Piston Installation" and I just saw it, it's in the back of the manual with all of the footnotes, i guess you call them. Not  where you think it would've been on that page....

 

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The comment about extra parts is just to say that the whole engine works together, as a system. If the engine doesn't have the compression it's supposed to have, or lacks a robust performance. It would be easy to say " If only I'd honed that cylinder I could be certain that it isn't some kind of blowby issue. 

   Unless you're a seasoned mechanic, it's ALL gremlins, and voodoo. Especially when you're talking about something like honing. My advice is to hone that sumbitch, and move on. I told you from the beginning, that you'll have to go back into the motor....It happens...almost always. It's how we learn, so embrace it lol.

   When you get it right...it'll be worth it.

 

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1 minute ago, kenfain said:

The comment about extra parts is just to say that the whole engine works together, as a system. If the engine doesn't have the compression it's supposed to have, or lacks a robust performance. It would be easy to say " If only I'd honed that cylinder I could be certain that it isn't some kind of blowby issue. 

:) I know, i just meant that as a joke :) 

 

2 minutes ago, kenfain said:

When you get it right...it'll be worth it.

Im sure it will be, a couple hundred bucks is a LOT cheaper than a new one!!!!!!

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Now THAT is funny. But you know you're buying experience. Sometimes it pays off directly, sometimes it's down the road. Troubleshooting is where you REALLY need to pay attention. 

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Yeah, i've put everything just about new in there.  Camshaft, Piston, new balancer, crank bearings etc.

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