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Dan B

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Dan B last won the day on October 17

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About Dan B

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Location Surprise, AZ, United States

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  • Gender
    Male
  • UTV Brand
    Own Joyner Renegade R2-1100cc
  • Interests
    Golf, aviation but had to give both up due to age related vision issues. Not bad enough to quit driving and off-reading.

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  1. My theoretical analysis of incorrect valve gap. I wouldn't say a lot of power if one cylinder, but more pronounced if on all cylinders. A larger than normal gap will cause the intake valve to open late and close early. The compression will be a little lower (less fuel/air mixture gets into the cylinder on the intake stoke) and cause some loss of power. Does the engine othewise runs smooth (not missing)? Your compression should be near 130 psi at sea level (based upon 14.7 psi atmospheric pressure and a 9.5 compression ratio minus a few pounds due to other factors). A larger than normal gap on the exhaust valve will also cause it to open late and close early which, in turn, keeps more burned fuel in the cylinder on the exhaust stoke, prevernting a full charge of fresh fuel/air mixture from being fully injested into the cylinder on the intake stroke.
  2. I would still check the valve clearances (cam to lifter clearance). Can't really tell clearances by looking at the valves. Lacking any other info that might say otherwise, the intake is 0.18mm/0.007"±0.05mm/0.0019", exhaust 0.25mm/0.0098"±0.05mm/0.0019". Excessive clearances will cause the cam lobe to "slap" against the lifter causing the clicking/clacking noise.
  3. Disconnect the negative battery terminal. Get an ammeter and connect it between the negative battery terminal and the negative battery cable. Then start pulling fuses until you notice a drop in the ammeter reading. That's the problem circuit. 1/4amp or less is okay. That could be caused by a clock or standby current for the ECU. You're looking for a larger current draw that would cause the sparking that you noticed. Take the battery and see if they can test it. The problem with these smaller batteries measured in Amp Hrs instead of CCA is that some places can't check them. Their equipment is calibrated in CCA. Some use an unreliable method of converting Amp Hrs to CCA by multiplying Amp Hrs x 7.5. At least it will give you something to test against. I keep a trickle charger on my SxS battery.
  4. I agree with Travis. Check valve lifter to camshaft clearances with the valve for the cylinder closed (cam lobe not in contact with the lifter). Dirt may have worked its way into the lifter. I'm not sure if this engine has hydraulic lifters (I don't know). If they do, I don't see where shims are needed to adjust clearances. But a lifter could be binding due to dirt whether a solid or hydraulic lifter. Were you able to determine where the metal shavings came from?
  5. I've said this on other posts. You'll find die-hard fans for any brand of UTV/SxS. There is no perfect UTV. Even brand name UTVs have issues with broken/overheated/burnedf belts, drive shafts, CV joints, engines, etc. especially when driven beyond their capability. I bought a used Joyner (paid $7k 3 years ago) because 1) I pave my own roads, 2) I can't see spending $20k-$30k+ for a "pretty" UTV that I might ride a few times a year. It's just not in my budget. The early Joyners had quality control issues, but they've seem to have improved. In other posts, the differenials seem to be a weak point. But I believe that the failures might be related to driving them beyond their limitations. I'll admit that UTVs with CVTs are easier to drive. The Joyners with the clutch and 5-speed transmissions require you to take an active role in managing power to the drive axles. The John Deere 825i uses the same Chery engine (800cc) as the early Renegades. One model of the Kawasaki also uses a Chery engine. If the UTV has a gasoline engine (3-cyl 800cc or 4-cyl 1100cc), it just might be a Chery engine. Those owners probably don't know that they are driving Chinese "junk". The larger displacement Chery engines are relatively common in cars sold in Asia, Africa and South America. In 2014, the Renegade has the 1100cc engine - same as their Trooper. The Joyner and Troopers are wide machines (60in); you may be limited to where you can ride on narrow trails. I did a search for UTV recalls. Most brand name UTVs & ATVs have had recalls. I couldn't find any recalls for Joyner Troopers or Renegades. Maybe they just don't issue recalls whether needed or not. Support for these UTVs however, may be difficult to find. Dealerships aren't as wide spread as name brand UTVs. I haven't experienced any issues with my UTV - yet. I use mine as a means of transportation in the backwoods, not as a race car to jump over cliffs. Personally, I like my Renegade.
  6. I'll try to explain it in words; pictures would be better. Here goes: You have 12vdc from the battery to the starter solenoid at all times. When you activate the ignition switch to the start position, it provides a ground path from the solenoid through the ignition switch onward to the neutral safety switch. The neutral safety switch provides the final round connection when the transmission is in neutral. The "igniter" wire is the ground connection that goes to the ignition switch.
  7. My first guess is the horn button is stuck. The ignition switch supplies 12vdc to the horn button. The horn button sends that 12vdc to the horn. The horn is not likely defective and I doubt the ignition switch is defective on such a new machine. It's impossible for a fuse to cause your horn issue. That's how they should be wired. Check to see if the horn button moves about 1/4" when you press it. If it doesn't, the button is jammed. I presume the problem wasn't there when you picked up the machine. However, in all my researching, I could not find an instrument panel that shows a horn button nor a wiring diagram.
  8. These are WIDE machines 60" class and it's heavy, about 1750lbs+ for the T2 & R2. Consider the width of the trails you're planning on riding. These have an automotive style clutch and transmission. You'll have to take a more active role in managing power to your drive axle(s). CVT transmissions are easier to drive. Mine has 1700+ miles on it. I run 50w oil in the engine. Anything lighter and you'll have low oil pressure (10psi) at idle when the engine is at operating temperature. It's not a real problem, but I like to see 20 psi at idle on my engine. You may have to do some of your own repairs if you can't find a local shop. I can't see spending $20k-$30k on a name brand fancy ride because other want to follow that crowd. It's not in my budget. ALL UTVs have some issues now and then, even the $30k machines. Mine has some nitpicking issues but they are not show stoppers. Personally, I like my ride.
  9. Just curious as to what circuit that 10 amp fuse was in (fuel pump?). I hope you replace the 20a fuse with an original 10a fuse.
  10. I've said this on other posts. There is no perfect UTV. Even brand name UTVs have issues with broken/overheated/burnedf belts, drive shafts, CV joints, etc. especially when driven beyond their capability. I bought a used Joyner because 1) I pave my own roads, 2) I can't see spending $20k-$30k for a "pretty" UTV that I might ride a few times a year. The early Joyners had quality control issues, but they've seem to have improved. UTVs with CVTs are easier to drive. The Joyners with the clutch and 5-speed transmissions require you to take an active role in managing power to the drive axles. The John Deere 825i uses the same Chery engine (800cc) as the early Renegades. One model of the Kawasaki also uses a Chery engine. If the UTV has a gasoline engine (3-cyl 800cc or 4-cyl 1100cc), it just might be a Chery engine. Those owners probably don't know it that they are driving Chinese "junk".. The larger displacement Chery engines are relatively common in cars sold in Asia, Africa and South America. In 2014, the Renegader has the 1100cc engine - same as their Trooper. The Joyner and Troopers are wide machines (60in); you may be limited to where you can ride on narrow trails. I did a search for UTV recalls. Most brand name UTVs & ATVs have had safety recalls. I couldn't find any recalls for Joyner Troopers or Renegades. Maybe they just don't issue recalls whether needed or not. Support for these UTVs however, may be difficult to find. Dealerships aren't as wide spread as name brand UTVs. I haven't experienced any issues with my UTV - yet. I use mine as a means of transportation in the backwoods, not as a race car to jump over cliffs.
  11. There is an OBDII port located at the end of a cable behind the passenger seat (R2). But it uses a proprietary protocol that no common OBDII reader can read That I can find. I have two OBDII readers and neither one can read the data even though 12vdc power is available. Fuel pressure is 49.8 psi, 50 psi is close enough for government work .
  12. According to the MSDS Berryman's injector cleaner using H.E.S.T. is acetone. It is in some of their fuel system cleaners. Seafoam fuel injector cleaner uses Benzene. I presume both are safe otherwise a lot of customers would have put them out of business. Gas engines of any kind should be run occasionally to promote the consumption of fuel before it goes stale and also to keep the engine lubricated.
  13. Keep us posted on your progress as some of us Joyner riders might run across the same problem in the future.
  14. Wow! With so little to go on, it could be almost anything. Does the fuel pump pressure drop off when this happens? Could be an internal fuel pump issue. How's the compression on the cylinders when it shuts down? Could a valve be hanging up after the engine gets warm? I would rule out any fuses - when they fail, it's permanent - no restart after cooldown. It sure points to a heat problem. Seems like some Joyners have transient issues. Once, my Joyner's idle went towards 3,000 RPM before I shut it down Did it a few times while I was troubleshooting the issue, then it went away before I could isolate the problem. Another time, it would shut down immedeiately after start up. Again, problem went away before I could isolate the issue. The battery wasn't fully charged but it was charged enought to start the engine with to problems. After I charged the battery, problem went away. Made no sense to me. Neither has reoccurred. Leaning toward the Idle Air Control.
  15. Let us know how things work out for you in case we need to get engine parts. A dependble source with rapid delivery is essential. 12-20 days isn't too bad considering the 7,000 distance by ship.


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