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I drilled a row of holes in the bottom of the stock tank from side to side about mid way front to rear and then welded a sub tank under the main fuel tank. This tank held about 2 quarts. I ran the outlet to the fuel pump out of this sub tank. No matter what I did and no matter what the stock tank was doing, this tank always had gas in it. It was a 2" deep U shaped tank with its ends capped and the top of the U against the underside of the stock tank.

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A surge tank is the way to go, you need an auxiliary gas tank, surge, and a secondary fuel pump, low pressure. The low pressure pump fills the surge tank and it supplies fuel to the main pump, so you have to do a little bit replumbing, There are two ways to do this, one is to have the secondary pump sending fuel to the surge tank and the excess drains back into the main tank, the second is to have a float system that shuts down the pump when the proper level is reached and starts the pump up when the lower level is reached. That's what I have. The main pump draws it's fuel from the bottom of surge tank and the pressure regulator return line MUST empty back into the surge tank or you defeat the purpose of the surge tank. The advantage of having fuel flowing into surge tank and then overflowing back to the main tank is it will keep the fuel cooler because the fuel cools the main fuel pump because the fuel flows around the pump armature.

I'll see if I can find the photos I have and put them in google drive and supply a link.

The surge tank only needs to have enough fuel in it to get you down the hill and keep you idling while you sitting on the hill, I'd say a quart would be min, but nothing wrong with having an extra gallon or two, the tank needs one or two ports at the bottom, one the main fuel pump, one for clean out or to get gas out for other stuff, like starting a fire, and at least 2 at the top, one for the aux fuel pump and one for the overflow back to the main tank, the return from the main fuel pump should be in the middle, IMHO, so the fuel is circulated with in the surge tank. When I did mine, I moved the main pump forward and mounted behind the passenger seat as well the aux pump and the filter too, but that may not be as safe as keeping it out of the cab, just a thought.

Kinarfi

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I drilled a row of holes in the bottom of the stock tank from side to side about mid way front to rear and then welded a sub tank under the main fuel tank. This tank held about 2 quarts. I ran the outlet to the fuel pump out of this sub tank. No matter what I did and no matter what the stock tank was doing, this tank always had gas in it. It was a 2" deep U shaped tank with its ends capped and the top of the U against the underside of the stock tank.

I said mine held 2 quarts by mistake. It actually holds about 1 quart. At 20 miles per gallon, that is about enough for 5 miles. Haven't found any steep hills that long. Never had a problem with fuel running out with this setup and its real simple to do.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I drilled a row of holes in the bottom of the stock tank from side to side about mid way front to rear and then welded a sub tank under the main fuel tank. This tank held about 2 quarts. I ran the outlet to the fuel pump out of this sub tank. No matter what I did and no matter what the stock tank was doing, this tank always had gas in it. It was a 2" deep U shaped tank with its ends capped and the top of the U against the underside of the stock tank.

Nice and easy. Thanks Lenny...

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