Rwpjtk

Doesn't want to start

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My 2013 500 will only start if I floor the gas pedal and then once it starts I have to pump the gas until it warms up a little it sounds horrible until it warms up.(around 20 seconds)and then it will stay running. The exhaust smells like raw gas for a little while. The throttle body has been changed. Someone suggested the mass air flow sensor could be the problem ( is that the MAP). It has been to 2 different shops with it not being fixed. I haven't been able to ride it since last fall.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

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This is the only problem I've had with it since I bought it. Yes I talked to Massimo they said sound like the fuel pump but one shop said they tested that and it was fine. The second shop had it for 5 weeks and never called me on it or even worked on it. They wouldn't answer their  phone or return calls after I left messages. But when I dropped it off the guy said it sounded like the mass air flow.

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No it's not fixed yet. putting a MAP sensor in it today. Thats what the mechanic says is wrong. Ill let you know if it works.  It has actually gotten worse. It wont even stay running now when i let off of the gas. Going to be tricky getting it on the trailer to take it the mechanic.

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You really need to have a diagnostic code reader with live data plugged in. This is the only way to read the EFI system as it runs. It will show if you have any hidden codes, it will show the voltage at the TPS, engine coolant sensor and so forth. All these things need to be working correctly for the engine to get the correct spark and fuel. But with out a Diagnostic reader plugged in, you will have to sit there with a meter and measure the electrical items one by one. The fuel injector simply gets a signal to pulse, this opens the injector at specific times to squirt fuel into the cylinder. This is confirmed by signals from either the timing sensor, or crank sensor. You will also need to make sure something as simple as the coolant temp sensor is working properly, if it is not reading properly, it will tell the engine it is either too cold or too hot. This will effect your fuel problems. You will also have to measure the map sensor, the tps sensor and so on. That is why it is so much easier to get it plugged in and read it as you try to start it. Is there anyone close to you that has a diagnostic reader to plug in when you try to start it?

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I have no idea what that means. Massimo needs a Delphi code reader. The guy that was working on it is at a lose. He doesnt have a code reader and will not spend the kind of money they want for one.

Now it won't start at all. It's getting to much fuel at start up. The whole throttle assembly, the injector has been changed. 

On 12/8/2017 at 6:31 PM, kenfain said:

Is this thing OBD2, or something else? If it is, OBD2, there's fairly cheap options out there for live data readers. 

 

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OBD2 is the same as what is used on all cars and light trucks manufactured for sale in America since 1996. If it has the same plug, it likely takes the same reader.  The professional versions of these readers can cost more than a thousand dollars. When software for these professional readers is added ( and they're updated often, since each manufacturer has brand specific codes) the cost can be several thousand dollars. But the good news is, there's generic information in each system, that's common to all vehicles that use the system. So you don't need the expensive version of this tool. You can use the cheap one, (they're about a hundred bucks) and do a little detective work. The code reader will tell you which part, or system needs to be investigated further. However in your case even that might not be necessary. But unfortunately, it will require someone who either knows, or has access to specific voltage values for that particular models electrical components. This information would still be necessary, even if you had the code reader. That's not saying that a reader wouldn't help. But you still need to be able to decipher the gibberish that a code reader puts out. On a car, there's lots of information on the internet that helps you decipher the information. On one of these, there just isn't that much that can be wrong with it, since there just aren't many components there. And I doubt that even the internet would help with diagnosis. I suspect that a multimeter and some time spent checking the components involved in telling the fuel system how much fuel it needs to start would be the best course of action.

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The smell of raw gas in the exhaust tells me one or more of your injectors might be stuck open.  The excess fuel pressure after shutdown might be bleeding off into the cylinder making restart difficult.  But that would also show black smoke upon start up.  If you have a source of compressed air, you might be able to see or feel air coming out the injector.  Worth a try.

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