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oceanjake

Aftermarket Fuel Pump?

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In the interest of always being prepared for trailside fixes (I go out as the solo vehicle quite a bit), I want to carry a spare fuel pump. Electric fuel pumps always seem to fail unexpectedly in cars, so it seems like a good idea. The joyner dealer quoted me $215 and had one in stock (which tells me they commonly break). They said it was a bosch pump. I have to believe that this bosch pump is available through a local autoparts store much cheaper. Does anyone have this number? Does anyone know of another alternative to this pump?

Thanks for the input. Also, as a newcomer to this board....looks like a lot of the people I want to know are on here. You know the type...the ones that can't leave anything alone!

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G'day oceanjake, glad to see you finally made it over to UTV Boards. I think your find the fact that your dealer has certain spare parts is partly because of what you said but also logistics, or the cost of. I have not heard of a fuel pump failing yet but you never know. Just to give you an idea of the cost of individually importing a spare part from China to NZ which is closer and cheaper than the States. A small item less than 5 KGs = US$90 air freight, bank fees in NZ for a T/T US$12.50 and bank fees in China US$25. Even if the item cost $1 wholesale before you even cost out the retail price you have a $127.50 charge, and then another charge from Team Joyner to the Dealer. The way around this is to bulk order spare parts and ship them out to the dealers with their vehicle orders.

Your plan of carrying a spare fuel pump is all good & it just might save your bacon one day.

Cheers Mike

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I had my Trooer loaded on my trailer ready to wash the other day when I noticed a fuel leak. Upon closer inspection I witnessed fuel dripping from the positive terminal. Of course I had to take the terminal off and clean the area to double check because I couldn't believe my eyes (which made the leak worse). Lucky for me I bought the extended warranty and a new pump is on its way. The funny thing is that the leak stopped after I washed my unit and is still holding after 4 days. All of a sudden it doesn't seem like a bad idea to carry a spare with a couple small vice grips because I too ride alone a lot of the time.

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The external stock pump for the 800cc & 1100s is only rated at 3 Bar and 115L/H. 3 Bar equals 43.51psi, however the fuel regulator is rated at 55psi so adjusts the pressure up & then on to the fuel rails at this factory setting. The upgrade external fuel pump (thanks to Art) is the Bosch 0 580 254 910 . It looks just like the stock pump with the same colour blue plastic wrap and it's the same size so will fit the stock bracket. It is however, an upgrade because the specs are 5 Bar (73.5psi) and 130L/H . Don't worry about the extra flow, that's feed back into the petrol tank.

I do see one major benefit for upgrading your fuel pump and just to quote from the Troopers owners manual "The temperature of fuel has a great influence on pump function. When working under high temperature for a long time, the pump pressure will drop rapidly if fuel temp. is over a certain value....." The Bosch 910 fuel pump will be able to cope better than the stock fuel pump in this saturation by having more fuel pressure.

So for you guys & gals riding around in the desert all day long and have experienced the engine missing, stopping or hard to start a hot engine, that could be why.

Kinarfi, could you put the Bosch 910 fuel pump in the Parts, Pieces, and Information for our Troopers please.

Cheers Mike.

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Thanks Brostar, and thanks for reminding me the list it, Got it done.

Another thing to consider with these high pressure fuel pumps is hosing, I replace my rubber hoses with Tygon Clear tubing and shortly there after, I experienced some leaks at the connections. It was weird, where the hose clamp band overlapped is where it leaked, to cure the problem, I used stainless aircraft tie wire to clamp the hose on. Take two wraps and put a dab of grease on pull it good and tight and the start twisting. I guess Tygon doesn't push around and mold like rubber hose.

Kinarfi

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Gee, mines been missing a little. I contributed it to the rich mixture I'm getting with my blower setup. Checked the plugs today and they had a little black soot around the outer edge but the center porcillen is a light orange-ish tan. So it apears a little rich and the engine has been running cooler then before. When I took the blower off my dealers machine, I noticed his regulator set at around 100#, I can only get mine up to aboue 65#. I may have to think about a new pump and keep my current one as a spare. Thanks for the input.\

Lenny

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The external stock pump for the 800cc & 1100s is only rated at 3 Bar and 115L/H. 3 Bar equals 43.51psi, however the fuel regulator is rated at 55psi so adjusts the pressure up & then on to the fuel rails at this factory setting. The upgrade external fuel pump (thanks to Art) is the Bosch 0 580 254 910 . It looks just like the stock pump with the same colour blue plastic wrap and it's the same size so will fit the stock bracket. It is however, an upgrade because the specs are 5 Bar (73.5psi) and 130L/H . Don't worry about the extra flow, that's feed back into the petrol tank.

I do see one major benefit for upgrading your fuel pump and just to quote from the Troopers owners manual "The temperature of fuel has a great influence on pump function. When working under high temperature for a long time, the pump pressure will drop rapidly if fuel temp. is over a certain value....." The Bosch 910 fuel pump will be able to cope better than the stock fuel pump in this saturation by having more fuel pressure.

So for you guys & gals riding around in the desert all day long and have experienced the engine missing, stopping or hard to start a hot engine, that could be why.

Kinarfi, could you put the Bosch 910 fuel pump in the Parts, Pieces, and Information for our Troopers please.

Cheers Mike.

The following site has good prices on these pumps. http://www.naautoparts.com/6.html?m8:cat=%...%2FFuel%20Pumps They sell 2 different ones, one is the original Bosch and the $59 one is idenical but made as an after market product. Specs are idenical. I went with the $59 one thinking that I won't be putting 100,000 miles on my Trooper. Knarfi, you might consider adding this site with it's lower cost option pump to the pinned parts list. Thanks

Lenny

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The following site has good prices on these pumps. http://www.naautoparts.com/6.html?m8:cat=%...%2FFuel%20Pumps They sell 2 different ones, one is the original Bosch and the $59 one is idenical but made as an after market product. Specs are idenical. I went with the $59 one thinking that I won't be putting 100,000 miles on my Trooper. Knarfi, you might consider adding this site with it's lower cost option pump to the pinned parts list. Thanks

Lenny

Man you guys are so lucky in the States to have the competition with retail stores to help drive the prices down and keep it real. The retail I paid for the Bosch over here was us$170 on special. I could of got 3 of the fuel pumps Lenny just got for that price. Good find Lenny so defiantly add this to the list Kinarfi

Cheers Mike.

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can anyone tell me what fitting i need to get to go onto the pressure end of the pump? I got my new pumps the other day and the look identical just like we thought.

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can anyone tell me what fitting i need to get to go onto the pressure end of the pump? I got my new pumps the other day and the look identical just like we thought.

Take the fitting of the stock pump and use it. This pump does put out much better.

Lenny

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That appears to be set up for a Banjo Fitting. I googled "banjo fitting" and saw several, priced from 8 to 50 dollars, but I didn't know what size you need, so I'll let you do your own research. I suggest you at least take a look, but I was concerned with the amount of flow they could handle, but then, that is what they designed it for. Again, your choice.

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Thanks guys, I was needing a second fitting so I could use it for a pump for my surge tank. I will look into the banjo fittings.

Thanks again,

Kevin

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Thanks guys, I was needing a second fitting so I could use it for a pump for my surge tank. I will look into the banjo fittings.

Thanks again,

Kevin

Were you planning on putting a switch on that or just let it run?

Kinarfi

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Were you planning on putting a switch on that or just let it run?

Kinarfi

I don't have the necessary skills to rig up a switch so I guess I'm gonna let it run.

Kevin

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