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Kinarfi

Unique Fixes

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Idle problems - - - - http://www.utvboard.com/index.php?s=&s...post&p=4460

Another idle problem was solved by undoing the wire that was wrapped around the plug wire for an hour meter. http://www.utvboard.com/findpost-t1524-p5814.html

Over heating problems, -- From Snowman -- One other problem is they will air lock. To get all the air out of the system you need to disconnect the small water line (about 1/4 inch) that starts around the thermostat housing and goes into a T with two larger hoses, drivers side. You need to remove the hose at the T and hold it in the air above the motor while holding your finger over the hose barb to keep the coolant in. Now you need to get some one to top off the rad. This sounds like your biggest problem to me. (http://www.utvboard.com/topic/1733-t2-issues/page__view__findpost__p__6993)

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Water seams to be a problem for most of us. Bicycle inner tube cut long enough to cover your electrical connections plus enough length to zip tie the ends tight on the wires at both ends of the plug. No more blowing fuses. Hard starting after getting wet is history. Drill a couple of drain holes in the bottom of the fuse box covers helps from water filling up in your fuse boxes. I have also covered the vent slots on the top of the fuse box cover under the dash and on the outside vents on the box behind the drives seat. Now I need to find a way to keep from blowing my fan fuse when I am in fan deep water. Any Ideas? Don't want to relocate the radiator if at possible.

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for those of you who haven't been inside their differentials yet, I highly recommend that you do, and change the bolt and make sure this set screw is tight, if it backs off, the pin can come out and grind away at the inside of the diff. take a look at the whole album.

Kinarfi.

it happened to me and here's another one on a renegade. http://www.utvboard.com/findpost-t1591-p6278.html

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When I got my trooper a few weeks ago there were no clamps on the square end of the rubber boots to the steering box.

I tried hose clamps & zip ties but they just slipped off. I could not find any square clamps any where. I took a foldler holder from my filing cabinet and took the steel rods out that you use to hang it in the cabinet. The width and thickness was perfet to fit the rubber boots. I cut them down and shaped them square with tabs to fit the boots, drilled holes in the tabs for a small bolt and nut. It work perfect!! I also ran .025 wire from clamp to clamp at each corner to insure these boots could not slip off.

Cheep fix and it only took me about 30 minutes.

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Replacing A-arm heims joints with a better fix.

After tightening my heims joints a few times, it was time to replace them with better ones. Here is what I did. First off I purchased my new joints from "americanstarauto" on Ebay. I bought 2 sets of 4 for $126.48 including shipping. The stock joints are approximately 5/8", actually 16mm. I went with 3/4" chromoly joints with Kevlar reinforced liner and a 3/4-16 male stim, all right hand. This joint has a static load strength if 27,000 pounds and is somewhat larger as you can see in the pictures. The A-arms must be removed but you don't have to remove the front spindals or axels. First I drilled the ends of the A-arms out to 11/16". There is plenty of meat there to be able to do this. I did it on the lathe, see photo, but it can be done on a drill press. To do it on a drill press, simply move the table so the edge is under the drill and fixture up the A-arm up the side of the table. I suspose it could be done with a 1/2"electric drill but keeping good alignment may be diffucult. After drilling, I put a small chamfer on the new hole to provide a nice starting area for the threads. I stayed with all right hand threads because I didn't have a 3/4-16 left hand tap. If you buy a tap to do this, get a good quality spiro point tap. The threads go in quite a ways and a good quality spiro point will do it the best. A cheap tap is going to get too tight in a ways. Carefully watch the alignment of the tap with the A-frame tub.

To be able to greese the joints, I drilled the stock bolts from the head down the center a bit past 1/2 way down the length of the shank with a 1/16"drill. I then drilled

the head with a #3 drill about 3/8" deep and tapped it 1/4-28 only about 1/4" deep to receive the greese fitting. I also ground a flat on the bolts shank where I drilled a side hole for the greese to exit. See photo.

I had to make adapter sleeves to reduce the 3/4" bore of the joint down to 16mm so I could use the stock bolts. Trying to drill the tabs on the frame that receive the joints wasn't possible due to their location, so sleeving was the best answer. I machined my own sleeves but 16mm is so close to 5/8" that you could use a bronze sleeve bearing to do the same job. Not centered bronze. A flange bushing that is 5/8" ID x 3/4" OD x 5/8" long including a 1/8" x 1" OD flange along with a flat thrust thrust bearing that is 3/4" ID x 1" OD x 1/8" thick should do it. The 1/8" thick flat thrust bearing slips over the flange bushing to provide a 1/4" thick flange leaving 3/8" sleeve to go into the heims joints ball. You will need 16 of these to make eight 2 piece sets. Each of these sets needs to have the sleeve bushing filed to create a flat spot on the 3/4" dia. of the sleeve all the way to the flange and the flat thrust bearing needs to have a groove cut or filed into one flat side and that same side to also have its bore chamfered. This provides a place for the greese to make its way to the joint itself. The groove on the flat thrust washer should face the heims joint ball.

I purchased heims joint or rod ends, which ever you want to call them, sealing boots to cover and completely seal the joint from dirt and hold the greese in. I know, they say not to lubercate heims joints but that is because they are not sealed then the greese just attracts dirt and teflon doesn't need lubercation. I'm old school and prefer greese when ever possible, it's just better, even with teflon. Bought the seals from "seals-itstore" on Ebay. Their part #RERS3. Eight pieces for $43.20 including shipping. The bronze sleeves with the extra thrust washer is pressed into each side of the joint ball. The 1/4" wide flange provides a place for the seal to seal against on each side if the joint.The seals have to be put on the joints before screwing them into the A-arms. You need to put the seal on the joint by putting it's shaft through a side hole then sliding the stim portion of the seal on the 3/4" threaded shaft. They are tight but they do go and then stretch the seal over the joint using a 1/4" piece of round bar ground to a ball end on one end. It's about the only way to stretch the seal over without punchuring it. They stretch a lot and are nice and tight when on.

The final job is to widen the mounting tabs on the frame. I used a large crecent wrench to reach all the way to the base of each flange to bend them out to the side about 30-40 degrees. Then take a 3/8" piece of flat bar a couple of inches long and 1-1/2" wide. Grind the 3/8" sides to create a trapizoid that fits in between the bent out tabs with the 1-1/2" side going across from one tab to the other. Now clamp it inplace and use it as a block to bend the tabs back to straight out but this time they will be 1-1/2" in between them. Now the joints will fit in.

All that is left is assembly and resetting the caster, camber and toe and your done after greesing. I now no longer have any clunking noise coming from the front.

Click through 9 pictures.

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Lenny

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Ok Stupid Carrier Bearing grease fitting. This is what we have done to mine..Drilled 3/4 hole through the center rail and put a grease whip on it and it is located on the front rail in front of gas tank. Also pulled the one out of steering box and put a 90 in it for now.......So now these things will get greased like they should.....

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Also Sprayed the heck out of the Thwow out bearing AKA release bearing...And bought Spray red grease to get her lubed back up the best we could.....

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Water seams to be a problem for most of us. Bicycle inner tube cut long enough to cover your electrical connections plus enough length to zip tie the ends tight on the wires at both ends of the plug. No more blowing fuses. Hard starting after getting wet is history. Drill a couple of drain holes in the bottom of the fuse box covers helps from water filling up in your fuse boxes. I have also covered the vent slots on the top of the fuse box cover under the dash and on the outside vents on the box behind the drives seat. Now I need to find a way to keep from blowing my fan fuse when I am in fan deep water. Any Ideas? Don't want to relocate the radiator if at possible.

for the fan, i installed a relay and auto reset circuit breaker, never had any issues since.

i used the original fan 12 V+ wire to switch the relay so the fan runs the same as factory, i pulled 12V+ straight from the kill switch to a 30 amp auto reset breaker and then into the relay feed, from there i ran a 10 ga wire directly to the fan. i pulled the original fan fuse and replaced it with a 5 amp fuse as all it does now is switch the relay.

when i get the fan into the water it will trip the circuit breaker but as soon as i get out of the water the fan comes back on automatically so i never have to worry.

i think with a good power source the fan sounds like it is turning faster but i never tach'd it to see.

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for the fan, i installed a relay and auto reset circuit breaker, never had any issues since.

i used the original fan 12 V+ wire to switch the relay so the fan runs the same as factory, i pulled 12V+ straight from the kill switch to a 30 amp auto reset breaker and then into the relay feed, from there i ran a 10 ga wire directly to the fan. i pulled the original fan fuse and replaced it with a 5 amp fuse as all it does now is switch the relay.

when i get the fan into the water it will trip the circuit breaker but as soon as i get out of the water the fan comes back on automatically so i never have to worry.

i think with a good power source the fan sounds like it is turning faster but i never tach'd it to see.

That's a good way to do it, i got frustrated with my fan so i hard wired fan 12v to a 35 amp toggle switch and then to + battery post.

Whenever i disconnect the master switch on dash the fan quit or if i switch the toggle switch off that do the same thing but now i feel i have more control over fan.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

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Correcting Swing Arm Strength Issues

There has been a lot of concern about the problems found with the Swing Arm design and its mount to the frame. There are a number of problems with the design as listed below.

1-Tabs holding the rear spindle housing and bolt length.
2- Twisting of swing arm main frame.
3- weakness of extension tubes going from Swing Arm to swing arm pivot sleeves.
4-Mis-alignment of swing arm pivot sleeves.
5-Tabs on main frame to thin and pivot bolt too short.

I went through all the pictures I could find and will post them here. Each picture has a file number that I will refer to in the hope of making my fixes clear. I don 't have all the pictures but I think this will give you the basic idea of what should be done. Remember that I run my Trooper hard through the rough stuff so I get some problems that some of the others may not get. I do my fixes to withstand the way I drive. I have not had any failure of my fixes yet. They are all staying solid and tight dispite running woop-de- doos at speed. If I catch an extra deep woop in the middle, I can bounce real hard and can totally bottom my suspension, real hard, but it takes it. You may not need this level of strength.

Picture #3973 The rear tabs that hold the axel spindle assembly at the rear of the swingarm are too thin and the bolts solid shank portion is too short. The short bolt puts the threaded part of the bolt in the tab itself. This causes the threads to flatten allowing loosness in the joint on that side which in turn allows the other side to work and loosen also. ( see picture #3970 ). This can happen on both the upper and lower tabs. I replaced the tabs with much stronger tabs and switched to 1/2-13 grade 8 boltts that were long enough so that the solid shank protion of the bolt made it thru both tabs. ( see picture #3999 ) The greese fitting is not needed nor does it do anything. These bolts should be exceptionally tight upon installation.

The swing arm itself is not strong enough to resist the torsion and other forces that can be put on it in hard use. Look at picture #3980 and you can see that the lower tube is actually bent at the tabs. Look at picture #3990 and you can see another tube that has bowed from hard use. Look at picture #3992 and you can see where the spot welds holding the stock sheet metal are cracking. Picture #3987 shows the swing arm after complete boxing of all sides right out to the end. All welds should be continous including rewelding, with a continous bead, the existing spot welds. 16 gauge steel is fine for boxing. Also, drill holes thru the sheet over each cross tube so you can weld thru the holes to better unitize the weldment.

Once the main swing arm is reinforced, you need to also strengthen the ends that extend to the pivot sleeves. Now that the arm is strong, all the stress goes to this part and if not strengthened, its flexing will cause it to fail. (see picture #4006 )

The tabs holding the swing arms to the main frame are also too thin and the bolt is also too short, putting the threads again in the tab. This develops slop after time and can cause the pivot sleeves to become mis-aligned. Picture #3998 shows corrected tabs and correct bolt lengths. I went to 3/4" grade 8 bolts and rebored or replaced the bushings in the sleeves for a nice close fit. Greese fittings here are necessary for proper maintaince. Picture #3995 shows how to re-align the pivot sleeves. Picture #3997 shows how to check the alignment. Picture #4000 shows the swing arm pivot sleeves with the added reinforcing so the sleeves don't tear loose from the arm itself.

Picture #1432 shows how I moved my lower shock mount to the side torwards the tire. Previously I said that the inside tab was flush with the outside edge of the swing arm side but as yo can see It is actually extended farther out. Again I wanted to get it as closs to the tire as I could.

Picture #1112 shows the reinforcement I put on the end of the swing arm to better support the pivot sleeves.

After I got everything else related to the swing arms weakness fixed, all the forces then went to the main frame itself and I totally tore out the lower frame tube that the frame tabs weld to.

Picture #1004 shows what happened at the last Jamboree when the swing arm completely tore the frame away. Picture #1009 shows the tube has been torn completely off the frame. Picture #1012 shows the torn off swing arm. Picture #1035 shows where I added gusseting after welding the torn off tube back in place. Notice that I also added a 1/8" thick strip to connect the 2 horzontal tubes together. This is welded continously all the way around on both sides. Picture #1029 shows another shot of the gusseting. Picture #1037 shows one of the gueests added to the front sides of the frame tubes behind the seats. There are 4 gussets on this side.

Everything I did was to stiffen things up to prevent flexing and to spread the stresses over a very wide area. You never totally get rid of flex but this approach spreads the stress over such a large area that the flex at any one point os so small that it doesn't cause metal fatigue. This pretty much covers what is the optimum fix for the swing arm area of the Trooper. There is one other way to correct this which is better, build a new Trooper frame.

Lenny

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Tightening the CV hubs to fit tight on the differential output shafts

I've been meaning to post this for some time now so maybe now is a good time. I didn't fix mine because I thought they would wear out but I'm sure they do wear some. I mainly fixed mine because of the clunking noise they can make. Fixing it means four less places making noise. This is what I did to fix mine. I started out by using a 1/16" thick cutoff wheel and cut 6 slots into the spline end of the CV outer housing. These were cut all the way down to the base. I then machined the area with the slots on a taper of .020" per 1" of outer length. The taper wants to run to the larger part of the outer but no more. Leaving as much material as possible but still having a full length taper. I then took a 3/4" thick round ring and machined a taper on its ID to match and sized so it would almost slide on but be about 1/8" of getting flush. One of the pictures shows it slid on this far. I then set the outer up in an hydraulic press. Didn't have one and always was going to build one, so I did. It's a 25 ton bench design. Got everything set up to be able to press the ring onto the spline. It requires taking the output shaft out of the differential, I had an extra one laying around so I used it. At that point, I heat the outers end to a cherry red and press the collar on, but not all the way. I wanted to go about 2/3 of the way to the bottom. I didn't want to go so far, making it too tight so that I couldn't slide them on the splines. I probably should have gone only about 1/2 way down because mine were a bit tight but they did go on with some medium tapping with a lead hammer. It would be better to be a bit loose and have to go back reheat and give it a little more then to be too tight. Once pressed on the hot red hot end, I let it cool for about 3 hours. By the way I punched the little plug that separated the spline from the joint itself out. Don't need it when things are tight. I then put 3 setscrews in the ring to tighten against the outers od. These were 120 degrees apart. I also drilled and taped three 3/8 fine bolt holes in the side of the ring again 120 degrees apart. With hex bolts in the taped holes, the heads towards the larger end of the outer, provides a way to get the ring slid back off when removal is required. When assembling, I would slide the collar on as far as it would go without forcing it and install the CV outer on the output shaft. I then used a puller to draw it onto the taper which makes it all act like a collet. It gets real tight. I then tighten the 3 setscrews to hold things in place. By the way, I used never seez on the rings Id to keep it from galling onto the shaft. It works great and is super solid on the shaft.
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Lenny

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If you're fuel pressure falls to stay around 60 psi then it could be the regulator and not the pump. Mine would only put out 20 psi so I thought the pump was bad. Put a new fuel pump on it and still didn't work. What was happening is it was sending it all back to the tank. So as a temp fix to get you buy for the ride or till you find a new regulator you can put a hose clamp on the line going to the tank and tighten it while watching your pressure and keep going till it reads around 60 psi

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